Great letter from Martha Roth of Independent Jewish Voices to the CBC’s Michael Enright, which was published on Peter Larson’s blog, Canada Talks Israel Palestine. Here’s an excerpt:

“Here is the crux of the matter. I am a non-zionist Jew and I do not support the idea of a Jewish state. I am also a member of Independent Jewish Voices Canada, an organization that believes in democracy, in equality for all, in Israel as in Canada.

Along with thousands of other Canadians, Jewish, Muslim, Christian and unaffiliated, we support the international call to boycott Israel until it respects the three democratic demands of the BDS movement: an end to the occupation, equality for non-Jews living in Israel, and a just solution for Palestinian refugees. That means that every time I say this, write it or attend a demonstration, B’nai Brith can report it as an anti-Semitic “incident.” B’nai Brith should brace for more anti-Semitic “incidents” as the BDS movement continues to grow.

But to call them “anti-Semitic incidents” is utter nonsense.”

And here is the rest: CBC’s Michael Enright is mistaken about how to approach anti-Semitism: Martha Roth of IJV

Advertisements

Two weeks ago a Palestinian teenager named Ahed Tamimi was arrested after slapping and kicking an Israeli soldier on her family’s property in Nabi Saleh in the West Bank.

Some of you might already be familiar with Ahed, whose image made the rounds on social media a couple of years ago when she fought off Israeli soldiers attempting to arrest her younger brother, whose broken arm was in a cast.

And here is a 2012 video of young Ahed demanding of Israeli soldiers, “where is my brother?”

As for the slapping incident, the Canadian activist David Kattenburg sums it up in a letter to his MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette:

“Ahed was arrested at her home on the night of December 19, without charge, following a now well-publicized incident in which she kicked and slapped an Israeli soldier who had entered her family’s property and refused to leave. The Tamimis — and the village of Nabi Saleh — are well known for their weekly popular protests against Israel’s apartheid regime, and specifically, in response to the seizure of their lands and ancestral spring by the unlawful Jewish settlement of Halamish.”

Kattenburg continues, “their protests (I attended one last May) are routinely greeted with tear gas grenades, high velocity teargas cannisters, “skunk” water (smells like sewage), rubber bullets and live rounds. Two members of Ahed’s family have been killed in the course of their protests. Days before the slapping incident, Ahed’s 15 year-old cousin received a rubber bullet in his face. He was placed in an induced coma prior to surgery, and may or may not be recovering.

“Ahed has now been charged with assaulting an Israeli soldier, among other crimes against Israel’s permanent military occupation, and stands to receive a hefty sentence. The vast majority [99.7% to be precise] of Palestinians charged under Israeli military law are convicted (in contrast, a Jewish settler who brutally assaulted Israeli pacifist Rabbi Arik Ascherman with a knife and his fists recently received a sentence of ‘community service’. Very typical).”

(It’s worth noting that Kattenburg, the son of holocaust survivors, is in the midst of a legal challenge against the Canadian Food Inspection Agency over its mislabelling of settlement wines as ‘Made in Israel’. Given that Justin Trudeau’s government has remained in lock step with the execrable Harper regime on Israel-Palestine, contradicting Canadian foreign policy by voting against Palestinian self-determination and rejecting condemnation of Israel’s illegal settlements at the UN, I’m doubtful Kattenburg’s letter will receive the meaningful response it deserves.)

Besides the context, the timing of Ahed’s arrest, which took place four days after the slapping incident itself, is significant. As Anshel Pfeffer wrote in Haaretz,

“The order to arrest Tamimi, four days after the incident and only after the video of her altercation with the officer had been broadcast on the nightly television shows, was an exercise in damage control and in satisfying the urge of the Israeli public to somehow expunge the humiliation. A Palestinian girl slapping an IDF officer was a national insult that could only be soothed by the pictures of her being taken from her home by female Border Police officers in full body armor.”

 

Since then, Israel’s education minister Naftali Bennett has urged the courts to jail Ahed for life, while the Israeli journalist Ben Caspit made the sinister suggestion that, ‘in the case of the girls, we should exact a price at some other opportunity, in the dark, without witnesses and cameras.’

Her fearlessness has earned Ahed the admiration of Palestinians and their supporters, and the profound hatred and contempt of most Israelis, who have dubbed her “Shirley Temple”. They accuse the Tamimi family of exploiting social media by manufacturing compelling images, as though they need making up. As Pfeffer wrote, ‘there simply is no way to stage manage a telegenic occupation.’ And in a textbook example of projection, they accuse the blonde blue-eyed teenager of not really being Palestinian (my Lebanese father has startling blue eyes and was white blonde as a child), thereby also exposing their own racism. After all, the Israeli claim to our loyalty resides in the colonialist argument that they are “like us”, as contrasted with the swarthy and barbaric natives who surround them. Clearly, Ahed Tamimi’s appearance threatens Israeli spin as much as her fists.

Since 19th December, much has been written about Ahed and Nabi Saleh, although naturally little critical commentary or contextual analysis has made its way into the mainstream press. Here are a few of the best pieces I’ve seen, with excerpts and links.

We Will Continue to Resist Israel’s Occupation as a Family by Bassem Tamimi (Newsweek)

“Earlier this year, a 20-year-old young man was shot in the stomach and killed during a demonstration in support of Palestinians on hunger strike inside Israeli prisons. Five years ago, my wife’s brother Rushdie was shot in the back and killed by a soldier during a demonstration against Israel’s bombing of Gaza. Two years later, on the anniversary of his death, my wife was shot in the leg. Nariman has also developed asthma as a result of breathing tear gas.

Ahed is a strong, fearless girl, and I am proud of my daughter’s steadfastness, but when I saw her sitting in the Israeli military court I felt helpless and scared for her. I am a parent and everything I do is to protect my children and to make sure they can live happily and freely one day. No matter what I believe about perseverance and pride, in the end, I’m a father and it pains me greatly to see my beautiful child imprisoned in a military court that sees and treats Palestinians as less than human.”

Ahed Tamimi Has Become the Symbol of a New Generation of Palestinian Resistancee by Ben Ehrenreich (The Nation)

“If you’ve seen the video that led to her arrest, you might have wondered why Ahed was so angry at the soldiers who entered her yard, why she yelled at them to leave, why she slapped them. That’s why. That and a thousand other reasons. Her uncle and her cousin killed. Her mother shot in the leg and on crutches for most of a year. Her parents and her brother taken from her for months at a time. And never a night’s rest without the possibility that she might wake, as she did early Tuesday morning, as she had so many times before, to soldiers at the door, in her house, in her room, there to take someone away…

Ahed Tamimi was not jailed for breaking the law—Israel, in its governance of the land it occupies, shows little regard for legality. She was arrested because she was all over the news, and the public and the politicians were demanding that she be punished.

They used words like “castrated” and “impotent” to describe how they felt when they looked at that soldier with his helmet and his body armor and his gun and at the kid in the pink T-shirt and blue windbreaker who put him to shame. For all their strength, power, wealth, and arrogance, she had put them all to shame.”

Nabi Saleh is where I lost my Zionism by Lisa Goldman (+972 Magazine)

“These are just a few of the things I saw in Nabi Saleh.

Once, I was standing on the roof of a home with three teenage girls who lived there. We were watching the demonstration from a bit of a distance — maybe 150 meters. Suddenly one of the soldiers standing down the road pivoted in our direction, raised his weapon, aimed, and shot tear gas canisters directly at us. He shot another couple of canisters at the house, shattering the living room window. The older girl told me that her family had stopped replacing it every time the soldiers broke it; the glass had become too expensive.

I also witnessed soldiers deliberately blanketing a small house in tear gas until its occupants, coughing and retching long streams of mucus, were forced to emerge. They were two elderly women, wrinkled and bent over, and a young woman in her twenties.

I’ve seen soldiers grab crying children and shove them into military vehicles, pushing aside their screaming mothers.

I’ve seen soldiers grab a young woman by her arms and drag her like a sack of potatoes for several meters along an asphalt road so hot that it melted the rubber soles of my running shoes, before tossing her into a military vehicle and driving away.

I’ve had my ankles singed black when a security officer looked me straight in the eyes and threw a stun grenade at my legs.

2018: The Year of Primary Sources by Marilyn Garson (Haaretz and Contrapuntal blog)

“Then a Gazan double amputee waved a flag before another wall. He was unarmed, far away from well-armed Israeli soldiers. When he was targeted, shot and killed by an IDF sniper, did your sense of justice join him on that field?

He was one of a dozen killed in these protests so far. Ahed Tamimi in military custody at the age of 16 years, and her 14-year-old cousin, comatose after being shot in the face; they are among an unconscionable number of child victims.

This violence is too debased. You are not immune to other suffering, so how can be a spectator at the suffering inflicted in your name? How can you not weigh in, with your numbers and your influence and your organizations, to arrest this accumulation of new pain, and bring a healing peace one step closer?

Or did you think you are not implicated?”

And if Ahed Tamimi were your daughter? by Gideon Levy (Haaretz)

“She could be your daughter, or your neighbor’s daughter, yet the abuse she suffers rouses no feelings of solidarity, compassion or basic humanity. After the outburst of anger over what she dared to do came the imperviousness. She’s a “terrorist.” She couldn’t have been our daughter; she’s a Palestinian…

If even Tamimi doesn’t manage to rouse feelings of solidarity, shock or guilt here, then the process of denial, concealment and repression – the occupation’s most important enterprise, after the settlements – is finally complete.”

“Never has there been such horrifying apathy here, never have the self-deception and the lies prevailed here so completely and never have there been so few moral qualms here in the face of injustice. Never has incitement won out so completely.”

A comment from director Mike Leigh ahead of Radiohead’s Tel Aviv gig on Wednesday. If you haven’t been following, artists around the world have been calling on Radiohead, who have (now infamously) expressed support for Tibetans and other oppressed people while insisting that playing in Israel will foster dialogue between the occupiers and the occupied – to cancel the gig.

‘As the lights go out in Gaza and Palestinian cancer patients die because they are denied travel permits by Israel, while a Palestinian poet in Israel lives under house arrest for a poem she wrote on Facebook, while a young circus performer from the West Bank languishes in administrative detention without charge or trial – Thom Yorke speaks loftily about ‘crossing borders’ and ‘freedom of expression’. One has to ask, freedom for whom exactly?’

The rest is here: Mike Leigh slams Radiohead for ignoring Palestinians

The debate that’s been generated by this very public dispute has thrust BDS into the spotlight, which is for the good I think. As for Thom Yorke, here’s his message to pro Palestine fans at last week’s Radiohead concert in Glasgow.

This piece by Haaretz’s Gideon Levy appeared on Middle East Eye on June 30th. I excerpt a few bits below, but I’d urge you to read it in its entirety. It speaks for itself, very painfully. I’m too old for naivety but apparently maintain the capacity for bewilderment that our political leaders collude with their shameful silence in the incremental genocide of the Palestinians of Gaza. Never again, indeed.

“One of the biggest experiments involving human subjects ever conducted anywhere is taking place right before our eyes, and the world is silent.

“The project is at its peak and the world shows no interest. This experiment on human beings, unsanctioned by any of the international scientific institutions whose oversight is required by the Helsinki Declaration, seeks to examine human behaviour in situations of extreme stress and deprivation.

“The experimental group does not comprise just a few, nor dozens or hundreds, nor thousands or tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands of people. The experimental population includes no fewer than two million human beings…

“At first Gaza was deprived of electricity for about a third of each 24 hours, then for about half, and now the level has been ratcheted up such that the two million residents of Gaza have electricity for only about 2.5 hours in each 24. Let’s see what that does to them. Let’s watch how they respond. And how about when they are supplied with electricity for only a single hour per day? Or for one hour per week? This experiment is still in its early stages, and no one can foresee its end…

“Israel bears primary responsibility for this situation, due to the siege it imposes, but Israel is certainly not the only culprit.

“The PA and Egypt are full partners in this crime. Yes, crime. This is 2017 and preventing millions of human beings from receiving electricity means depriving them of oxygen and water. Israel’s responsibility cries out to the heavens because Gaza is still under partial Israeli occupation.

“Gaza is dying, slowly. Elsewhere, its suffering matters to no one. No one in Washington, or Brussels, or Jerusalem, or Cairo nor even in Ramallah. Incredibly, there is evidently almost no one who cares that two million people are abandoned to the dark at night and to the sweltering heat of the summer days, with nowhere to run and no shred of hope. Nothing.”

June 5 1967 was the day Israel launched an allegedly pre-emptive attack on Egypt, starting what came to be known as the ‘six-day war’.

I have no memory of the event, in which the Egyptians were swiftly routed by Israel, as I was only one year-old when it took place, but since that time, the pre-emption defence has been widely refuted. As James North reminds us on Mondoweiss, its many challengers include the American historian Norman Finkelstein.

In his book, Image and Reality of the Israel-Palestine Conflict, Finkelstein argues that the war was actually a land grab, a thesis he supports with a number of carefully documented facts. First, a planned meeting in Washington on June 7th between Egypt’s Vice-President, Zacharia Mohieddine, and officials in Lyndon Johnson’s administration aimed at defusing the crisis undermines Israel’s claim that Egypt was on the verge of attack. There is also Israel’s promise to do nothing until June 11th, which it promptly broke on June 5th.

‘We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him.’

In addition, Finkelstein offers up this quote from Menachem Begin, the Irgun terrorist gang leader responsible for the King David Hotel bombing in 1946, who went on to become an Israeli Prime Minister:

‘Prime Minister Menachem Begin, former Minister without portfolio in PM Levi Eshkol’s cabinet, while addressing Israel’s National Defence College on 8 August 1982: “In June, 1967, we again had a choice. The Egyptian army concentrations in the Sinai did not prove that Nasser was really about to attack us. We must be honest with ourselves. We decided to attack him.” (New York Times, 21 August 1982)’

Writing in Haaretz, Amir Oren tells us that Moshe Dayan’s memoirs confirm Begin’s admission. ‘Right after the aerial attack, there will be a general announcement that won’t go into details and won’t say anything about who attacked first – something along the lines of “Hostilities broke out,” and then the background that made it necessary for Israel to break the noose,’ Dayan recounted.

‘Our actions should be depicted as a response to the Arabs’ attacks, and in the first 24 hours we should be “the ones in jeopardy”‘ Dayan wrote.

Surely Finkelstein’s land-grab thesis is best supported by the fact that this ostensibly short-lived conflict has spun into a vivid brutality that has lasted throughout my lifetime, in the longest military occupation in contemporary history. Its mechanics would be unspectacular were it not for their grotesque efficiency, honed over a generous half century during which the world has stood idly by, indulging the inevitably and increasingly vicious tantrums of a child to whom no one ever dared to say ‘no.’

Settlers armed with weapons and Teflon-coated entitlement

In those five decades, Israel has fine-tuned the oppression of millions of Palestinians, including trying Palestinian children in military courts who’ve signed confessions in a language they don’t understand in otherwise evidence-free trials, so that their parents can be shaken down for thousands of shekels which pay the court’s judges, while launching studiously random nighttime raids on Palestinians’ homes to ensure that they live in a state of permanent terror.

The current regime pushes through legislation to erase Arabic from the country’s streets and schools and to ‘normalise’ land-theft, while settlers armed with weapons and Teflon-coated entitlement roam the streets like jackals, mowing down Palestinian children and attacking Palestinian farmers, and occupation forces do their bit by harassing and intimidating Gaza fishermen.

This local campaign of bullying and state sanctioned criminality is supported by a well-funded and equally rigorous global PR operation, in which a double act of party donations and the threat of vicious and defamatory smears constitute the carrot and stick that keep Western governments supine. Meantime Israel normalises its colonialist ambitions with breathtaking chutzpah, daring FIFA, Eurovision and other ostensibly non-political organisations to exclude it thereby proving their own latent anti Semitism.

The result is a level of foreign influence that would make Russian hackers drool with envy.

Of course, in Israel the term ‘Occupation’ is used with a wink and a nudge these days. Recently the horror show Prime Minister, Bibi Netanyahu – by their own reckoning, a friend of Donald Trump, Theresa May and Justin Trudeau – admitted he has no intention of returning the West Bank to the Palestinians now or ever. And each of those leaders dutifully makes clear to their own rank and file that any diversion from the risible ‘two-state solution’ talking point that provides unassailable cover for relentless and unapologetic Israeli expansionism will cast them into the wilderness.

Meantime, the siege of Gaza – a collective punishment meted out to its 1.8 million inhabitants for daring to elect the wrong government – grinds on with barely an eye brow raised.

‘We make music, not war.’

Yesterday evening, I attended a concert by the Galilee String Quartet, a young ensemble of siblings who are Druze Palestinians from Israel. The concert was terrific, spanning works from Beethoven to Fairouz to the musicians’ own compositions, but for me it began rather jarringly. Introducing the group, eldest brother Omar Sa’ad, whose viola studies have been punctuated by stints in Israeli prison for refusing to enlist, assured us half-jokingly that the family are not hate-filled terrorists. Indeed, ‘We make music, not war’ is the ensemble’s slogan.

Omar’s comment reminded me how every aspect of the Palestinian identity in the West has been saturated with the political by those who have sought to erase it entirely. It brought to mind the agonised faces of children being brutalised by Israeli soldiers, their jeans drenched with urine as their organs go into free-fall in the grip of such fear. That in turn made me think of Ta-Nehisi Coates’s powerful exposition of the materiality and vulnerability of the black body as a political canvas in Between the World and Me, which won the National Book Award in 2015.

It would break your heart if you have a heart to break, and a conscience not yet desiccated by cowardice and cynicism. It surely broke mine a little, but the damage might have been worse were it not for the music, joyful laughter and youthful jitters there to stitch it up. And so I listened, the Fairouz especially taking me back to the eight-track tape of hits by the exalted Lebanese singer which we used to listen to when I was a kid, loaded into our Country Squire station wagon headed for Dairy Queen.

But this morning I was inevitably pulled back to my desk and this mostly-written blog for which I’d already documented the horrors below, captured with headlines and excerpts, in what has turned into a never-ending wrong.

Video: Let Palestine be “wiped out,” sings Jerusalem Day mob

‘After militarized police units clear the parade route of Palestinians, even from the Muslim Quarter, thousands of Israelis assert their territorial and religious claims to the city with a massive march, dancing and singing victory songs…’

‘It has long been common for marchers to belt out racist songs, including “Zachreni Na,” with its call for ethnic cleansing: “Palestine – May their name be wiped out!”’

Jewish settlers write ‘death to Arabs’ in Jerusalem

At one of the Palestinian cars, the extremist Jewish settlers wrote: “Revenge. Binyamin Richter says hello.”…

One of the Palestinian owners of the vandalised vehicles, Amer abu-Hamed, posted pictures of the damage to his Facebook page but wrote he and his friends have no intention of filing a complaint as they have no faith in the police.

Israeli settlers release wild boars on Palestinian farms

‘Speaking to the PIC reporter, the farmers affirmed that hundreds of wild boars were deliberately released by Israeli settlers to destroy their fruit trees, leading to heavy losses.’

14-year-old girl joins dozens of Palestinian women in Israeli prison

Addameer [a Palestinian prisoner support and human rights group] has also reported on the treatment of Palestinian women prisoners by Israeli prison authorities, stating that the majority of Palestinian women detainees are subjected to “psychological torture” and “ill-treatment” by Israeli authorities, including “various forms of sexual violence that occur such as beatings, insults, threats, body searches, and sexually explicit harassment.”

“These techniques of torture and ill-treatment are used not only as means to intimidate Palestinian women detainees but also as tools to humiliate Palestinian women and coerce them into giving confessions,” the group stated.

Another patient in Gaza dies after being denied access to hospital

WHO figures have shown Israeli approvals of permits have declined year on year since 2012 and have fallen further in 2017, with almost half (46%) of patients applying to leave Gaza via the Erez Crossing in March being refused a permit by the Israeli authorities, or not receiving a response in time to attend their appointments. In February, 40% were delayed or denied.

Israeli police assault, detain Al-Aqsa guards as hundreds of Israelis take to holy site

Al-Aqsa compound director Sheikh Omar al-Kiswani told Ma’an that Israeli police forces assaulted a group of four of the mosque’s guards at Lion’s Gate, after the guards “objected to the provocative behaviors of Israeli settlers during their raid of Al-Aqsa”…

The incident occurred as dozens of right-wing Israelis and ultra-religious settlers marched through and toured Al-Aqsa under the protection of police forces in celebration of Jerusalem Day.

Combatants for Hate

Israel refuses to allow 225 Palestinians into the country to attend a joint Israeli-Palestinian Memorial Day ceremony. ‘The Palestinians who sought to enter Israel wanted to sit in the same room with parents whose soldier sons had been killed, with bereaved families from the occupying nation.’

‘The devastation of losing a child is identical for all human beings simply because they are human beings. But this message isn’t allowed entry into Israel. The only Palestinians who are allowed to enter Israelis’ consciousness are terrorists, murderers and suicidal fanatics. The government has an interest in maintaining this outlook, which assumes that there is no partner and no Palestinian people, only terrorists. Anyone who dares think otherwise remains beyond the pale.’

Israeli forces fire tear gas, bullets at Palestinian hospital in Ramallah

“The assault caused panic and fear among children, women, and elderly patients at sections of the center,” [Palestinian Minister of Health Jawad] Awwad said. “This fear will never be erased from the memories of the children who came to the hospital to receive treatment, not to enter war.”

Israeli settlers write racist graffiti on walls and cars in Jerusalem

‘Local resident Morad Issa said that surveillance cameras captured the images of two Israeli settlers infiltrating into the neighborhood at about 3:15 am. The cameras showed the pair writing graffiti on the walls and on a car. But Israeli police say they have no suspects in the case, although Jerusalem District police say they have opened an investigation.’

Teenage Palestinian girl ‘executed in cold blood,’ witnesses say

‘However, shortly after the shooting, an eyewitness told Ma’an that Hjeiji had been standing near Damascus Gate, more than ten meters away from a group of Israeli border guard soldiers, before she was killed.’

“One of the soldiers started to shout ‘knife! knife!’ and moments after that, about five soldiers opened fire at her from every direction,” he said.’

Another witness said the girl was first hit in the chest and fell to the ground, “but Israeli soldiers continued to fire at her back.”

‘Pizza Hut’ and Israeli army radio join in grotesque attacks on Marwan Barghouti

[Note: this story is rather old but Noy’s comments resonated so I’ve included them here].

‘As Orly Noy wrote in the Hebrew version of her article in Local Call titled “When did we become so beastly” (my translation):’

‘“When did we become so beastly? How did we become this loser, this despicable nation which celebrates in glee that a human whose body is close to collapse after continuous starvation, has put some crumbs in his mouth? How did we become this nation that sets up a grill outside the prison walls so that the smell of the meat would reach the nostrils of the hunger strikers and exacerbate their tortures? How have we become this appalling and sickening thing?”’

Gaza health crisis deepens as 33 percent of medicines at ‘zero stock’

‘The UN has also stated that the number of patients being referred outside of Gaza is also increasing. Despite this, as MAP has highlighted in a recent briefing, patients are frequently denied permits to leave Gaza for treatment by the Israeli authorities, with 40 percent denied or delayed in February 2017. According to the UN, the percentage of denied or delayed permits has increased each year since 2012. In the last month, two patients, one a five-year-old girl, died after missing medical appointments in East Jerusalem while awaiting a response to their permit requests.

Note: the title of this blog comes from the Katherine Anne Porter story, about the trial for robbery and murder of the anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti.

Another forceful statement from an American academic appalled by the MLA’s push permanently to stifle criticism of Israel. Tim Brennan is a professor of Comparative Literature, English and American Studies at the University of Minnesota, and is affiliated with the Institute for Global Studies and the Institute for Advanced Studies.

Here is an excerpt:

“This effort to censor — and even to render permanently invalid – the richly deserved condemnation of Israel’s violations of international law and its unspeakable treatment of Palestinians, is disgraceful, and would embarrass the organization in the eyes of many here and abroad.”

Source: “An Outrage and a Betrayal”: Tim Brennan Statement against MLA Resolution 2017-1

Some of you might recall a few pieces I posted about the Modern Language Association’s debate about an academic boycott of Israeli institutions. Not only did the resolution fail at the organisation’s conference in January, some MLA members put forward an astonishing ‘counter-resolution’ effectively barring the academic group from ever criticising Israel in the future. Below is a must-read from one of the many critics of that counter-resolution.

Here is an excerpt:

The resolution itself, that we refrain from endorsing “the boycott,” is a nonsense. As things currently stand, the MLA endorses no boycott. Within the framework of the MLA, therefore, there is nothing from which to refrain. Why are we having a vote at all on something non-existent?…

Israel and all too many of its academic institutions proudly participate in such denial of Palestinian rights and academic activities. Does the MLA really wish to go on record as promoting Israeli academics’ freedoms while denying those of Palestinian academics?’

The rest is here: “Misleading or Flatly False”: Tim Reiss’s Statement Against MLA Resolution 2017-1